Jewish Museum Milwaukee

Jewish Museum Milwaukee preserves and presents the history of the Jewish people in southeastern Wisconsin in a way that emphasizes the American values of tolerance, respect, freedom and celebration of diversity. The Museum offers interactive displays, a focused education program, notable special exhibits and a collection of artifacts that includes a one-of-a-kind tapestry by artist Marc Chagall. Our community’s Holocaust Memorial is located in front of the building.

Location
1360 North Prospect Avenue
Milwaukee, WI 53202
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Museum Public Hours
Monday-Thursday*: 10:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m.
Friday: 10:00 a.m.-2:00 p.m.
Sunday: Noon-4:00 p.m.
Saturday: Closed
Closed for Jewish holidays.
Free parking behind the building.

* Open until 7pm every third Thursday of each month.

Admission Prices
Adults, $7
Seniors (60+), $6
Students, $4
Children Age 6 and under, Free
Active Duty Military, Free

Jewish Museum Milwaukee is offering the nation’s active duty military personnel including National Guard and Reserve and their families FREE admission. For information on other Blue Star Museums in Wisconsin, click here.

Membership


Jewish Museum Milwaukee has so much to offer, including engaging changing exhibits, special events and programs, a dynamic permanent exhibit, all-ages educational programs, celebrated archives, and rental facilities.

As a member of Jewish Museum Milwaukee, you will not only play an important role in ensuring quality programs, but you also gain unlimited access to the Museum and a wealth of opportunities for discovery and growth.

As a member at any level, you will enjoy:
Free museum admission
Reduced program fees
10% discount in the museum store
Members only events

Current Exhibit


Fabric of Survival: The Art of Esther Nisenthal Krinitz

February 17 - May 26

Esther Nisenthal Krinitz was 15 when she defied Nazi orders, separating from her family as they and the other Jews of their Polish village reported to a nearby train station. Making their way to a village where they were unknown, Esther and her younger sister survived the war by posing as Polish farm girls. They never saw their family again.

Fifty years later, determined to show her daughters the family she had lost, Esther turned to needle and thread to create a series of 36 hauntingly beautiful, exquisitely detailed works of fabric collage and embroidery – a legacy born of love, loss, and the sheer force of memory.

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